Resources

Pollen Sense and Pollen Wise

https://pollensense.com/  and the PollenWise App

  • Allows you to check what allergens are present and at what level those allergens are in your air hourly. This will assist you in planning your day and adjusting medication if needed. It also has a coaching feature that allows you to track how you felt on a particular day to help identify what allergens are affecting you. 

American College of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

https://acaai.org/

  • Excellent website with lots of patient resources on various allergic conditions and asthma. It also has an easy search tool to help you locate an allergist in your area. 

American Academy of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology

https://www.aaaai.org/

  • A very informative site with a helpful glossary providing definitions of allergic conditions and terms. It also has a virtual allergist tool that can give you information about the allergy symptoms you are experiencing.

Food Allergy Research and Education (FARE) 

https://www.foodallergy.org/

  • An amazing site focusing on all things related to Food Allergy. It has great resources including A Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Emergency Care Plan that I give all my food allergy patients a copy of and ensure they or their caregivers know how to fully utilize before our consultation ends. This is the premiere food allergy site for patients. 

National Eczema Association

https://nationaleczema.org/

  • An excellent site with lots of tools and information for eczema sufferers of all ages. They also have an App called EczemaWise that makes it easy for you to record your triggers, symptoms and treatments in real time so that you are more aware of what you are experiencing and can communicate this as accurately as possible with your physician

Asthma and Allergy Foundation of America

https://www.aafa.org/

  • This is a great site that I like specifically for the asthma resources it provides. It has an excellent version of an Asthma Action Plan that I like to use with my asthmatic patients so we are on the same page about how to manage their asthma on a daily basis, what to do when they begin to flare and when they need to call me or seek help from a medical professional. 

GoodRx

https://www.goodrx.com/

  • This revolutionary site has and continues to save my patients tons of money on their prescriptions. It allows them to search what pharmacy in their area has the best price on their medications in their area and provides a coupon that they can present to the pharmacist to ensure they get the price as advertised. The GoodRx App is extremely easy to use and I cannot recommend it more.

Vanicream

https://www.vanicream.com/

  • I’m a huge fan of their skin care line for my eczema patients as they remove the most common irritating ingredients found in topical treatments and provide a solid product. Their products aren’t for everyone but I often recommend them because they are effective in most and are not too expensive. 

Cerave

https://www.cerave.com/

  • Cerave is another great option I like to give my eczema patients. Cerave prides themself on having ceramides in their products that help support the skin barrier which increases moisture retention. Like Vanicream, their products are relatively inexpensive and hard to beat.

Xolair (Omalizumab)

https://www.xolair.com/

  • Xolair was the first injectable biologic medication initially prescribed by allergists and pulmonologists for adults with severe allergic asthma with elevated IgE levels. It’s efficacy and safety has held true throughout the years and it is now approved for kids 6 and up with asthma. However, it has really shined with it’s chronic urticaria indication for which I have seen it change countless lives. Although there are now many other competitors out there, it’s hard to deny the impact it has made and will continue to make on asthma, urticaria and possibly other allergic conditions in the future. 

Dupixent (Dupilumab)

https://www.dupixent.com/

  • I have never been more excited about the approval of a medication than I was when Dupixent was approved for eczema. And this medication has not disappointed me. I have seen it change several lives and read about countless others that have been positively impacted. It has 3 indications currently and can be given at home for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (ages 6 and up), moderate to severe asthma (ages 12 and up) and chronic sinusitis with nasal polyps. At this moment in time, for the appropriate patient, this is my go-to biologic. 

Auvi-Q

https://www.auvi-q.com/

  • This is my favorite epinephrine device due to its ease of use and size. The fact that it is voice activated and talks the patient or caregiver through use in the event of anaphylaxis is golden. It empowers patients, boosts confidence and has a calming effect during this difficult time. Over the years, Auvi-Q has also been gracious and supportive to several of my patients who needed epinephrine but could not afford it. As a result, I will always be a huge fan.